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Black-striped Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3

 

 

Family : RANIDAE
Species : Hylarana nigrovittata
Size (snout to vent) :
Female 6.0 cm,  Male 5.5 cm

Play call

The distinctly patterned Black-striped Frog inhabits the mainly drier lowland forests of continental Asia, and has adapted well to disturbed areas. It is commonly found by the banks of small rivers, streams and pools, including man-made ponds. The species is less commonly found in the interior of moist rainforest.

The species exhibits the typical shape of the Ranidae family (i.e. 'typical frogs'). It has a slender body, pointed snout, moderately large eyes, long hind legs and prominent external ear-drums.

It is easily identified by the broad dark stripe which runs along each flank from the tip of the snout, through the eye to the base of the hind leg. The dorsal surface is medium brown, sometimes mottled, and the lower flank and belly are creamy yellow to white. The hind legs are patterned with dark, irregular bars or are mottled.

The Black-striped Frog is widespread in the region, ranging from parts of eastern India (e.g. Assam) and Myanmar, through Thailand and Indochina (including parts of southern China) to more northerly parts of Peninsular Malaysia. It is likely that this is a species complex, which further study will subdivide into separate species.


Figs 1 and 2 : Typical specimens with thick, dark stripe along the flanks. Seen at Pulau Banding, Temenggor Lake, northern Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : This pair of frogs from Khao Yai National Park, central Thailand (approximate elevation of 1000 metres) probably belong to the Black-striped Frog complex, though the dark stripe is less developed than in typical specimens.


References : H3