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Common Greenback
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5


Fig 6

 

Family : RANIDAE
Species : Hylarana erythraea
Size (snout to vent) :
Female 7.5 cm,  Male 4.5 cm

A common species of scrubland, grassland and agricultural areas, this frog is easily identified by the pair of white bands running along the sides of the body. It is sometimes called the 'Red-eared Greenback' on account of the colour of the tympanum (left). The back may be green or brown.

It is mainly nocturnal, and relatively approachable, generally sitting still if disturbed. It may be encountered clinging to shrubs, or in puddles of water or by small streams. 

Its range extends from Thailand and Indochina to Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore, and down to the islands of Java, Borneo, Sulawesi and the Philippines.


Fig 1 : Typical example from Kranji Marshes, Singapore.

Fig 2 : Specimen from Khao Yai National Park, Thailand.

Fig 3 : Pale specimen from Mandai, Singapore.

Fig 4 : Typical specimen on leaf litter in Singapore's central forests.

Fig 5 : Example from Langkawi, northern Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 6 : The tadpoles are speckled brown or olive-brown with an elongate head.


References : H2, H3