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  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
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Dark-eared Tree Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5



 

Family : RHACOPHORIDAE
Species : Polypedates macrotis
Size (snout to vent) : Up to 12 cm ?

The Dark-eared or Masked Tree Frog occurs in lowland rainforest, and can be found adjacent to small pools and puddles in flooded forest areas.

It can be identified on the basis of the broad, dark stripe extending from behind the eye and along as much as one-third of the flank. The stripe may thin posteriorly, or even break into separate patches.

The dorsal skin is mottled pale to medium brown, and the underside pale. The lips are pale with no barring. As with other Polypedates species, the hind feet are extensively webbed, and the fore feet largely unwebbed. It builds foam nests.

The species ranges from Peninsular Malaysia (and possibly southern Thailand) to Sumatra, Borneo and parts of the southern Philippines. It does not occur in Singapore.


Fig 1 : Example from Lambir Hills, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo.

Fig 2 : A 7 cm specimen calling from low vegetation, showing the typical dark ear stripe and unwebbed forefeet.  Panti Forest, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : Large adult of around 12 cm snout-to-vent length, clinging to tree trunk around 3 to 4 metres above ground. Note the extensive webbing of the hind feet. Panti Forest, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Figs 4 and 5 : Two specimens from Danum Valley, Sabah, Borneo.


References : H4