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Larut Torrent Frog
   
   

Fig 1
 

Fig 2


Fig 3
 

Fig 4

 

Family : RANIDAE
Species : Amolops larutensis
Size (snout to vent) :
Female 7.5 cm, Male 4.5 cm

Torrent Frogs, or Cascade Frogs, are adapted to life amongst the torrents, waterfalls and wet boulders which cascade out of Southeast Asia's rainforests.

They are usually to be found clinging to boulders just above the stream level, however if disturbed these frogs do not hesitate to leap into the fiercest flowing water, only to emerge moments later clinging to another rock downstream.

The tadpoles have a modified lower lip, which acts as a sucker, allowing them to cling to rocks in the swiftest of river currents.

The Amolops genus ranges throughout Burma, Thailand, Indochina, Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Borneo, however A. larutensis, or the Larut Torrent Frog, is restricted to Southern Thailand and Peninsular Malaysia.


Fig 1 : Large adult on streamside vegetation at Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 2 : Small adult in typical streamside posture.  Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : Large adult perched on fallen tree trunk.  Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 4 : Tadpole clinging to a granite boulder in a fast flowing stream.  Lake Kenyir, Peninsular Malaysia.


References : H3