SEAVR 
 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Cicada Tree Eco-place  
  Malaysian Nature Society  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Malayan Treehole Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


 

Family : MICROHYLIDAE
Species : Metaphrynella pollicaris
Size (snout to vent) : Female 4.1 cm, Male 3.4 cm

This small, microhylid frog is more often heard than seen : the Malayan Treehole Frog adds its distinctive call to the night-time sounds of Peninsular Malaysia's hill resorts such as Fraser's Hill, Cameron Highlands or Maxwell Hill.

Males call from the inside of water-filled tree holes, particularly favouring the interior of thick bamboo stems if available. Studies show they are able to adjust the pitch of their simple piping call to match the acoustic properties of their chosen hole, and the amount of water with which it is filled, thus achieving a  resonance which carries their call a long distance. Thus, they 'play' their tree hole like a woodwind musical instrument. On  active nights, when males are desperately trying to attract a female to their hole to mate, the overall effect is of an evening chorus of random, but melodic 'peeps' and 'whoops' from all directions in the forest.

Mating takes place inside the tree hole, where the eggs soon hatch to tadpoles, which in turn metamorphose to young froglets. When ready, these emerge as young adults from their confinement, presumably to go in search of their own hole.

The Malayan Treehole Frog is attractively patterned with vague banding and mottled patches of light brown, orange-brown, dark brown, fawn and cream. The head is sometimes of darker brown. Its skin surface is rough.

Metaphrynella pollicaris is restricted to montane areas of Peninsular Malaysia up to around 2000 metres elevation. A closely-related species, the Bornean Treehole Frog Metaphrynella sundana, occurs in Borneo.


Fig 1 and 2 : Resting on a tall blade of grass.  Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : Clinging to the whitewashed wall of a colonial-era bungalow.  Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.


References : H3