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Pipistrelles
   
   

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Vespertilionidae
Species : Pipistrellus spp.

Forearm Length : species vary between 2.9 and 4.6 cm
Weight : species vary between 3 and 22 grams

There are more than 30 species of bat in the genus Pipistrellus, around half of which occur in Southeast Asia and eastwards to Papua New Guinea.

Pipistrelles are small, insectivorous bats which inhabit a variety of open niches : some species are known to hunt for insects over water bodies, while others fly undetected amongst the treetops.

They weigh between 3 and 22 grams, and their manner of flight is similar to that of large butterflies or moths, with wing beats which have a 'fluttering' motion.

Pipistrelles typically have small, rounded ears, and a short muzzle. Their eyes are small, and their fur is dense. Many species are superficially similar in appearance and can only be separated on the basis of dentition and by the characteristics of the baculum (the bone inside the penis).


Fig 1 : Javan Pipistrelle Pipistrellus javanicus from Singapore, found on the campus of a local university. This species is wide-ranging and has adapted to disturbed forests and urban areas.  Photo thanks to Adeline Yong.

Figs 2 to 4 : Two examples of Javan Pipistrelle Pipistrellus javanicus found in the grounds of a condominium in Singapore, near a large forested area.


References : M5, M6



 

 

 

Fig 1
  
ゥ  Adeline Yong

Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4