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  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
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Ridley's Myotis
   
   

Fig 1
  

Fig 2
  

Fig 3
  


Fig 4

 

 

 


 

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Vespertilionidae
Species : Myotis ridleyi

Forearm Length : up to 3.7 cm
Weight : up to 6.5 grams

Ridley's Myotis inhabits lowland, primary forest in southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and parts of Borneo. It has been recorded from the forest understorey, and in the vicinity of lowland forest streams.

This small bat naturally roosts in caves, rock crevices and hollow, fallen logs, as well as small crevices in road culverts.

Its fur is short and dark brown to grey-brown, with paler underparts. Its ears, face and muzzle are dark brown to blackish. The tragus (the projecting structure at the front of the ear) curves forward. The feet are small, and are quite hairy.

In Krau Wildlife Reserve (Peninsular Malaysia) adult specimens of this species weigh between 4.0 and 6.5 grams.


Fig 1 : This group of four tiny bats is identified as Ridley's Myotis based on their size, the shape of the nostrils and the domed shape of the head. They were found clinging to the ceiling of a stream culvert which passes beneath a forest road in Johor, Peninsular Malaysia. (The orange-brown masses on the roof of the culvert are wasp nests made from mud).

Fig 2 : Close-up of the domed head, small eyes and blackish ears.

Fig 3 : A forest stream near a roost of Ridley's Myotis in the lowlands of Johor, Peninsular Malaysia, which has a sandy substrate and deeply weathered boulders.

Fig 4 : Close up of a roosting pair, clinging horizontally to small fissures and cracks in the culvert.



References : M5, M6, M12