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Common Molly (introduced)
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


 



 

 

 

 

Order : Cyprinodontiformes
Family : POECILIIDAE
Species : Poecilia sphenops
Maximum Length : 6.0 cm

The Common or Green Molly and its variants, which include the Black Molly, are popular aquarium fish. This is a close relative of the ubiquitous Guppy.

Native in freshwater streams and brackish water habitats in Central and South America (from Mexico to Columbia), the species has been  introduced into parts of Southeast Asia.

They are prolific breeders which can adapt to hardy, urban environments. In Singapore they occur in concretised canals, storm drains, ponds and polluted rural streams.

They are omnivorous, and feed on various aquatic invertebrates, such as insects and worms, as well as plant and other organic debris.

In Southeast Asia, the species is listed as occurring in the Philippines, Singapore and parts of Indonesia.


Fig 1 : Part of a shoal of twelve Common Molly, living in a brackish tributary of the Singapore River.

Fig 2 : Close-up of an adult, with erect dorsal fin.

Fig 3 : Tributary flowing into the Singapore River inhabited by Common Molly.  Taken in 2007, this rare photo shows the last remnant of natural mangrove habitat in this once-tidal waterway, which passes through the heart of the city.


References :
- F1
-
fishbase.org

Thanks to Kelvin Lim for helping with identification.