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Forest Snakehead
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5



 

Order : Perciformes
Family : CHANNIDAE
Species : Channa lucius
Maximum Length : 40 cm

An attractive species, the Forest Snakehead is easily identified by the row of dark patches along the flanks. The dorsal surface of adults also has numerous small, dark spots. Juveniles are striped.

As with other Channa species, the body shape is streamlined and the dorsal fin extends along the entire length of the posterior half of the body. The species occurs in slow-flowing forest streams and swamps where it feeds on smaller fish, frogs and freshwater shrimps.

The Forest Snakehead is widely distributed in Southeast Asia and beyond.


Fig 1 : Coming up for air: a 30 cm long Forest Snakehead rises to the surface of a forest stream, Singapore.

Fig 2 : A handsome Forest Snakehead in a slugggish forest stream, Singapore.

Fig 3 : The barred markings on this large 40 cm adult, appeared slowly as the fish was being observed : this may be a response to a perceived threat to the young fry under its care.

Fig 4 : The fry are boldly patterned with black stripes.

Fig 5 : The pectoral fins are dark with pale yellow spots.


References : F1