Focussing on the vertebrate
 fauna of SE Asia
  

 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  Herpetological Soc. Singapore
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Saddle Barb
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


 



 

Order : Cypriniformes
Family : CYPRINIDAE
Species : Barbodes banksi
Maximum Length : 18 cm ?

Typically barb-shaped, with a pronounced dorsal fin and deeply forked tail, the Saddle Barb generally inhabits clear forest streams but can also be found in less shady, open country streams. It occurs in small shoals.

It can be identified in the field by a large, grey, triangular patch below the reddish dorsal fin, and sometimes a dark patch towards the base of the tail. Juveniles have other dark patches in the posterior half of the body.

The Saddle Barb is easily confused in the field with a similar species, the Two-spot Barb S. binotatus, but the dark patch below the dorsal fin of the latter appears as a small black round spot.

The species has been identified in at least Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia. Both S. banksi and S. binotatus are found in Singapore; S. banksi is only found in forest streams, while S. binotatus is found in rural areas where it may have been introduced.


Fig 1 : The dark blotch near the dorsal fin is well developed in this 8 cm specimen

Fig 2 : Saddle Barbs often swim in mixed shoals with other species, such as the Spanner Barb Barbodes lateristriga.


References : F1