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Brown Tree Skink
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3
 

Fig 4

 

Family : SCINCIDAE
Species : Dasia grisea
Size (snout to vent) : 13 cm
Size (total length) : 28 cm

A diurnal, but elusive, resident of lowland primary and secondary forests. It is characterised by a greenish-yellow underside and a series of dark bands across the medium brown dorsum.

In juveniles the patterning comprises a series of dark spots on the head, yellow and brown bands across the dorsum, and a mainly yellow tail with minor brown bands. Members of the genus are similar in proportion to the Eutropis genus, such as the Many-lined Sun Skink.  

Aquatic behaviour has been observed in captivity; this skink will plunge into ponds in search of small fish or aquatic insects.   

The species ranges from Peninsular Malaysia to Borneo, Sumatra and the Philippines. In 1994 the species was found for the first time in Singapore, and has since been confirmed as uncommon but widespread in the central forests.


Fig 1 : This specimen was spotted regularly on the same tree trunk, in tall secondary forest, for more than a year.

Fig 2 : The same specimen catches the last rays of the afternoon sun

Fig 3 : Another specimen peering out from a hiding hole in a rotten tree.

Fig 4 : This specimen prefers to hide in a crevice in a rotten tree stump.

All photos taken in Singapore.


References : H1, H3