SEAVR 
 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Cicada Tree Eco-place  
  Malaysian Nature Society  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Forest Crested Lizard
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3
 

Fig 4

Family : Agamidae
Species : Calotes emma
Size (snout to vent) : up to 10 cm
Size (total length) : up to 38 cm

This attractive lizard inhabits various forest habitats including dry deciduous, coastal, and moist evergreen. It can be spotted on tree trunks, often low down.

Its identifying features are the single spine above each eye, and twin spines above the tympanum (external ear-drum). Patterning and colouration can include various shades of brown, green and grey. Males are generally darker during the breeding season. The fingers and toes are of great length.


The Forest Crested Lizard ranges from India through Burma, southern China and Thailand to northern Peninsular Malaysia.


Figs 1 and 2 : Fully-grown adult male, photographed at Pulau Banding, Temenggor Lake, northern Peninsular Malaysia.

Figs 3 and 4 : Young adult, probably female, photographed at Layan Beach, Phuket, southern Thailand. Note the spine above the eye, which helps to identify the species.

Fig 5 : Greenish specimen from Kaeng Krachan, Thailand : probably a male.

Fig 6 : Adult male from Kaeng Krachan, Thailand.

Figs 5 and 6 thanks to Charles Currin.


References : H1, H3


 
Fig 5
   
ゥ  Charles Currin
Fig 6
   
ゥ  Charles Currin