SEAVR 
 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Cicada Tree Eco-place  
  Malaysian Nature Society  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Titiwangsa Horned Tree Lizard
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4



 
 

Family : AGAMIDAE
Species : Acanthosaura titiwangsaensis
Size (snout to vent) : males 12 cm, females 15 cm
Size (total length) : males up to 30 cm, females up to 37 cm.

The Titiwangsa Horned Tree Lizard (or 'Malayan Mountain Horned Agamid') has been found in two locations in the Titiwangsa Range of Peninsular Malaysia, which forms the backbone of the peninsula, namely Cameron Highlands and Fraser's Hill.

Before its formal description in 2009, the species was misidentified as being Acanthosaura crucigera.

Its adult body colour is yellow-brown to olive-green, patterned with numerous ocelli, or eye-like patterns. There is a dark band around the neck, and the tail is plain.

It possesses a long spine extending above each eye socket, and small spines above the head and along the vertebral line. There are no spines on the back of the neck.

The ecology of this species has not been studied but, as with other horned tree lizards, it has been observed on the forest floor foraging for food which probably comprises mainly invertebrates.

This species appears to be endemic to the main range of Peninsular Malaysia. Its range probably extends further north than Cameron Highlands and further south than Fraser's Hill : the species has been found at these two locations by virtue of the easy access to lower montane areas which these two hill stations offer.


Figs 1 and 2 : Adult female resting on a young sapling at the edge of lower montane primary rainforest at Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.  Spotted by Sophia S. Baker

Figs 3 and 4 : Another adult female specimen from Fraser's Hill, at the side of a forest road.


References : H11