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Indochinese Silvered Langur
   
   

Order : PRIMATES
Family : Cercopithecidae
Species : Trachypithecus germaini

Head-body length : 49-57 cm
Tail length : 72-84 cm
Weight : Up to 6.5 kg ?

The Indochinese Silvered Langur, or Indochinese Lutung, inhabits lowland mixed evergreen or deciduous forests, and riverine forests.

The species was once considered to be a northerly population of the Silvered Langur Trachypithecus cristatus, but is now recognised as a distinct species. Some authorities consider that populations of Indochinese Silvered Langur east of the Mekong River should be considered a different species again, namely the Annamese Silvered Langur Trachypithecus margarita.

The fur is long and comprises various shades of grey. The tail is long and also grey. The face, which has dark grey skin, is framed with impressively long pale hairs, which form a marked crest on the crown. Infants have orange fur. The feet and hands are dark grey to black.

The diet comprises young leaves, fruits and flowers.

This species is considered as endangered. It occurs in moderate numbers in parts of southern Burma and central Thailand. In Indochina it is considered to be widespread but uncommon in Cambodia, and to be highly localised in southern Laos and south-central Vietnam.


Figs 1 and 2 : Adult pair with impressively long, pale facial hairs.

Fig 3 : Adult with juvenile whose fur has begin to change from the bright orange typical of infants, to the grey of older juveniles.

All photos from Kien Luong karst area, Kien Giang Province, Vietnam by Andie Ang.


References : M5


Links : IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

 

Fig 1
  
ゥ  Andie Ang
 
Fig 2
  
ゥ  Andie Ang
Fig 3
   
ゥ  Andie Ang