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Wallace's Flying Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family : RHACOPHORIDAE
Species : Rhacophorus nigropalmatus
Size (snout to vent) :
Female & Male 10 cm

Probably the most dramatic looking frog in the region, and a species first described by the great naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, Wallace's Flying Frog is distinguished from other flying frogs by its large size, and the black colouration of the webbing on all four feet.

Living mainly at mid-canopy level of tropical rainforests, the extensive webbing allows for long glides from tree to tree. The species can be found at ground level when it descends to mate and construct its bubble nest.

The dorsal surface of the body and legs is a vivid green, and the side yellow. The large eyes have horizontal pupils.

The species is known to fall prey to tree climbing snakes. Follow this link for images of a Sawtooth-necked Bronzeback consuming what appears to be a Wallace's Flying Frog.

The species ranges from Thailand, Laos and Vietnam through Peninsular Malaysia to the island of Borneo.


Fig 1 : A pair of Wallace's Flying Frog clinging to vegetation 3 metres above a flooded roadside ditch.  Danum Valley, Sabah, Borneo.

Fig 2 : Despite their large size, adults of the species cling to slender twigs with confidence.  Danum Valley, Sabah, Borneo.

Fig 3 : Specimen with all four feet splayed, showing typical black webbing between its fingers and toes.  Photographed at Gunung Belumut, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.


References : H3