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Kuhl's Creek Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4

 

Family : DICROGLOSSIDAE
Species : Limnonectes kuhlii
Size (snout to vent) :
Female 6.7 cm, Male 8.7 cm

Kuhl's Creek Frog, or Large-headed Frog, is a species of primary and tall secondary forest, where it can be found in the narrowest and shallowest of forest streams. This species ranges from lowland plains up to at least 2000 metres above sea level. 

Its dorsal colouration comprises various shades of brown including pale brown, dark brown or orange brown, and this is usually patterned with darker mottles and streaks. There is invariably a dark bar extending between the eyes, and there is often dark barring on the forelimbs and hindlimbs. The belly is white. Skin texture is rough with numerous small tubercles.

A similar species, the Corrugated Frog Limnonectes laticeps, is smaller, more stout and lacks the dark bar between the eyes.

On mainland Asia, this species occurs in parts of southern China, through Burma, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam to Peninsular Malaysia. Further south it occurs on the islands of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Sulawesi. This wide-ranging distribution, however, probably represents more than one species.


Fig 1 : Specimen from Mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo at an elevation of 1500 metres. This specimen is somewhat lighter in colour than usual. Note the well developed dark bar between the eyes.

Figs 2 and 3 : Specimen from Khao Yai National Park, central Thailand, at an approximate elevation of 1000 metres.

Fig 4 : Large-headed male from Khao Yai National Park, central Thailand, at an approximate elevation of 1000 metres.


References : H3, H4


Thanks to Leong Tzi Ming for assistance.