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Lesser Sheath-tailed Bat
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5

  

 

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Emballonuridae
Species : Emballonura monticola

Forearm Length : up to 4.5 cm
Weight : up to 5.5 grams

Sheath-tailed Bats are so-called because of their short tail which protrudes from the membrane between their legs, however when the legs are stretched out the tail disappears into the sheath. The Lesser Sheath-tailed Bat is the smallest species of the genus Emballonura, weighing just 5 grams. It roosts near cave entrances, in rock crevices, or in large tree holes.

The fur colour is dark to reddish-brown, and the wings narrow. The ears are triangular-shaped, and the nose simple in form.

The species ranges from Southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore to Sumatra, Java, Borneo and Sulawesi.


Fig 1 : Roosting beneath a large sandstone boulder by day.

Fig 2 : A colony of Lesser Sheath-tailed Bats roosts under this rocky outcrop, used as a Buddhist shrine.

Fig 3 : This roost has more than 20 individuals.

Fig 4 : An unusual, but typical, roosting posture for this species.

Fig 5 : Close-up of a specimen from Panti Forest.

All images from Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.


References : M1, M2