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Black-bearded Gliding Lizard
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5


Fig 6


Fig 7



 

Family : Agamidae
Species : Draco melanopogon
Size (snout to vent) : 9 cm
Size (total length) : 24 cm

The dorsal surface of the Black-bearded Gliding Lizard is generally greenish in colour. The male (left) possesses a long black gular flag, whilst the female has a smaller gular flag which is reddish grey to grey. The patagium is brownish-black covered with yellow spots. 

Its body is long and slender, and the tail comprises around 60% of total length.

Its diet comprises mainly ants, termites and other small invertebrates. The female lays just two eggs in each clutch.

This small to medium species is common in lowland primary and secondary rainforests, and its range encompasses Southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, and Sumatra, Borneo and other Indonesian Islands. In Singapore it is restricted to the primary forests of Bukit Timah and the mainly secondary forests of the Central Catchment Area.


Fig 1 : Male with gular flag and lappets fully extended, from Peirce Forest, Singapore.

Fig 2 : Example from Sungai Sedim, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia warming itself, with patagium extended, in the morning sun.

Fig 3 : Male with gular flag and lappets relaxed. Peirce Forest, Singapore.

Fig 4 : Female with gular flag and lappets relaxed. Seletar Forest, Singapore.

Fig 5 : Females with gular flag and lappets extended. Seletar Forest, Singapore.

Fig 6 : Female from Upper Thomson, Singapore, on a lichen covered tree trunk.

Fig 7 : Male from Belum Forest, northern Peninsular Malaysia.


References : H1, H2