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Annandale's Rat
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


 

 

Order : RODENTIA
Family : Muridae
Species : Rattus annandalei

Head-Body Length : Up to 22 cm
Tail Length : Up to 27 cm

Annandale's Rat or Singapore Rat inhabits secondary forest including abandoned rural scrub, and former rubber or coconut palm plantations. It seldom occurs in true primary forest.

At night this rat can be seen foraging amongst fallen branches, low scrub and low branches of saplings.

Its dorsal fur is greyish-brown, and the underside is generally pale yellow but sometimes white : demarcation between its  dorsal and ventral fur is quite sharp. The tail is long and nearly naked, and the eye medium in size.

Annandale's Rat is found in in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore, and parts of Sumatra.


Fig 1 : Adult foraging in secondary forest, Singapore.

Fig 2 : Adult foraging in a decaying coconut palm in young secondary forest, Singapore.

Figs 3 and 4 : This juvenile is tentatively identified as an Annandale's Rat : it is feeding on an earthworm amongst the leaf litter of a secondary forest, Singapore.


References :