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Large Black Flying Squirrel
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3
 

Order : RODENTIA
Family : Sciuridae
Species : Aeromys tephromelas

Head-Body Length : Up to 42 cm
Tail Length : Up to 50 cm
Weight : Up to 900 grams

Flying Squirrels possess a supple skin flap which extends from the length of the body to all four feet : this allows them to glide effortlessly from tree to tree. They are exclusively arboreal, spending their lives mainly in the high canopy of tall forests, and generally nocturnal. By day they rest in tree holes.

The Large Black Flying Squirrel is amongst the largest of the many species of flying squirrel. Its dorsal fur is dark brown to black, and the underside is dark brown to dark grey. The head is small and the tail long.

The species ranges from southern Thailand and Peninsular Malaysia to Sumatra and parts of northern Borneo. It does not occur in Singapore.


Figs 1 and : Specimen in the canopy of tall, mixed forest in Gunung Arong Forest Reserve, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : Example from Panti Forest, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia peering out from its nesting hole in a tall, dead tree in the late afternoon.


References : M2, M3