SEAVR 
 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrog calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Cicada Tree Eco-place  
  Malaysian Nature Society  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Mountain Many-tooth Snake
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2
 

Fig 3


Fig 4




 

Family : COLUBRIDAE
Species : Sibynophis collaris
Maximum Size : 76 cm

Snakes of the genus Sibynophis, of which six species occur in Southeast Asia, are called 'collared snakes' or more precisely 'many-tooth snakes'.

These snakes have an unusually large number of teeth, which are closely packed together onto a separate structure not fixed to the jaw bone.

Sibynophis collaris, called here 'Mountain Many-tooth Snake', but also known as 'Collared Black-headed Snake', is largely a montane species, occurring at elevations of up to 3000 metres, though it may also occur in some lowland areas too.

This is a terrestrial, secretive species which remains largely hidden amongst forest floor debris, where it preys on other small reptiles, frogs and invertebrates.

Its body is relatively slender, and its head is slightly larger in width than the front part of the body. Its eyes are of moderate size, with rounded pupils.

It is medium brown in colour, with a dark vertebral stripe and a pale stripe on each flank. There is a dark band on the back of the neck, behind which are one or two rows of orange or yellow scales.  The top of the head is speckled, and the lips are white.

This species ranges from northern parts of the Indian subcontinent (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh) and southern China (including Taiwan), through Burma, Thailand and Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos) to Peninsular Malaysia. It has not been recorded from Singapore.


Fig 1 : Specimen from Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia at an elevation of 1100 metres. It was found one morning at the edge of a mountain road passing through primary, lower montane forest.


References : H12, H14