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Four-lined Tree Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5


 

Family : RHACOPHORIDAE
Species : Polypedates leucomystax
Size (snout to vent) :
Female 7.5 cm,  Male 5.5 cm

Play call

A common yet charming species of disturbed forests, scrubland, parks & gardens. Its repetitive monosyllabic call is an instantly recognizable sound in much of rural Southeast Asia. Most commonly encountered a few feet from the ground clinging to small stems, it may also be found in puddles on wet ground. 

Its colour varies from green-grey to a less common ruddy-brown; the four lines on its back may be absent in some populations. Its eggs are laid next to ponds in a foamy mass glued to overhanging vegetation. Once hatched, the young tadpoles fall into the water below to start a new life.

This species occurs in Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Sulawesi and the Philippines.


Fig 1 : Mating pair, Singapore. The male is considerably smaller than the female.

Fig 2 : Tadpole, Singapore.  Note the white spot on the snout, which helps to identify the species.

Fig 3 : Adult female in reed bed, Sedili, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 4 : Foam nest on rocky boulder next to shallow pool, Singapore.

Fig 5 : Lightly speckled, dull brown specimen from Phuket, southern Thailand.

References : H2, H3